Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Is Blogging the New Crack?

You might think so if you saw a piece in today’s New York Times entitled “For Some, the Blogging Never Stops.” Technology reporter Katie Hafner talked with one gung-ho blogger whose wife was not amused when he spent most of…
May 27, 2004

You might think so if you saw a piece in today’s New York Times entitled “For Some, the Blogging Never Stops.” Technology reporter Katie Hafner talked with one gung-ho blogger whose wife was not amused when he spent most of their recent anniversary vacation in Key West blogging about the latest Web technology from his laptop. Another blogger said “If this were beer, I’d be an alcoholic.” Of course, almost every new computing technology has been demonized at one time or another as a dangerous new addiction. Bulletin boards, online role-playing games, videogames, instant messaging, and even Web browsing have all been the targets of hand-wringing by sociologists, journalists, and parents worried that users will lose their grip on real life. Some users do – and for that, they should seek help. But almost any human activity can turn into an addiction, and it puzzles me why technology-mediated behaviors so often come in for special criticism. I really have trouble adding the image of compulsive online diarists to my bag of worries.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station
Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station

Why China is still obsessed with disinfecting everything

Most public health bodies dealing with covid have long since moved on from the idea of surface transmission. China’s didn’t—and that helps it control the narrative about the disease’s origins and danger.

individual aging affects covid outcomes concept
individual aging affects covid outcomes concept

Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid

Drugs that rejuvenate our immune systems and make us biologically younger could help protect us from the disease’s worst effects.

Europe's AI Act concept
Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.