Skip to Content
Uncategorized

E3 Wrap-Up

I’m back from E3, with the sounds of Missy Elliot’s performance at the Sony party still thumping in my ears. As anticipated, the most interesting stuff at the show were the upcoming new handhelds: Sony’s PSP and Nintendo’s DS. I…

I’m back from E3, with the sounds of Missy Elliot’s performance at the Sony party still thumping in my ears.

As anticipated, the most interesting stuff at the show were the upcoming new handhelds: Sony’s PSP and Nintendo’s DS. I had a chance to get hands-on with the DS. It was fun, and fresh – a new way to game. There are two screens, offering different points of view, and also touch-screen capabilities – a first. The PSP was hands-off, but looks sleek and will surely benefit from Sony’s roster of brands. Stay tuned

Sony also had a new flock of EyeToy games on display. Pretty cool stuff – like a hover-board racing game called AntiGrav that tracks your head and hands. As for the shooter war – I had a chance to play Doom III and Halo 2, and check out new footage of Half-Life 2. Doom III is creepy and claustrophobic, but a bit like a haunted mansion with the monsters on a track. Half-Life 2 has the most “realistic” feel, with impressive outdoor environments, and potentially empathetic characters. Halo 2, however, gets my early vote for shooter of the year. The game is just awesome – better graphics, better action, and a compelling sci-fi plot. It’s the one to beat.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.