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Bridge Over Rising Water

In 2002, severe flooding in Central Europe left millions isolated. Soon, however, a floating aluminum bridge could help keep flood-prone communities connected. The modular one-lane highway can be assembled in just three days. A 70-meter prototype was built on a lake in the Netherlands; 18 factory-built sections were slotted together on site. Polystyrene foam inside each section makes the road unsinkable, and foam-filled outriggers increase stability. Cars can cross the road at speeds of up to 80 kilometers per hour. Rural Dutch communities are considering a longer-term deployment of the road, which was developed by a consortium of Dutch companies. There’s also interest from Norway and eastern Europe, where it can take up to three years to build a conventional road across waterlogged land.

Deep Dive

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Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

stock art of market data
stock art of market data

Maximize business value with data-driven strategies

Every organization is now collecting data, but few are truly data driven. Here are five ways data can transform your business.

Cryptocurrency fuels new business opportunities

As adoption of digital assets accelerates, companies are investing in innovative products and services.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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