Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Another Vote Against Diebold

A new study commissioned by the Maryland legislature states that electronic voting machines bought by the state from Diebold for $55 million have such poor software and physical security that an election could be disrupted or even stolen, according to…
January 30, 2004

A new study commissioned by the Maryland legislature states that electronic voting machines bought by the state from Diebold for $55 million have such poor software and physical security that an election could be disrupted or even stolen, according to the New York Times. The study represents the first hands-on effort to hack these machines under conditions found in an election. The team, from consulting firm RABA Technologies in Columbia, MD, did say that the weaknesses could be addressed–at least preliminarily–in time for the state’s primary elections in March.

This is only one in a series of reports attacking the security of electronic voting machines, particularly those manufactured by Diebold Election Systems. Diebold’s machines are used statewide in Georgia as well as in several populous counties in Califonia, Texas, and Ohio. Stanford computer scientist David Dill, who is among the security experts asking for more stringent regulation of this new technology, explains his concerns in this TR interview.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.