Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Are the RIAA Lawsuits Working?

A study, released this week by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, finds that the percentage of Americans involved in music file-sharing has droped by almost a half since the RIAA started a “scorched earth” policy of suing consumers….
January 6, 2004

A study, released this week by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, finds that the percentage of Americans involved in music file-sharing has droped by almost a half since the RIAA started a “scorched earth” policy of suing consumers. A nationwide survey of 1358 Internet users from Nov. 18 to Dec. 14 found that 14 percent had downloaded music that month. By comparison, 29 percent had downloaded files in a comparable period last March. The decreases are most dramatic in those groups – college students, for example – which have historically been most actively engaged in file-sharing.

The researchers read these numbers as indicating the degree to which the legal actions have intimidated consumers, though they concede that some people may be much less open to report downloads now than they were before the legal actions started and thus the results may exaggerate the shift in actual behavoir.

The announcement of these results comes as the record industry announced that record sales last year slipped by only 1 percent, slowing a three year cycle of declines in music purchases.

The one-two punch of legal download services and legal action against file-sharing seems to be having at least a short term impact on record industry revenue and consumer behavior. What we need to be looking at, however, is whether it may also be having a negative impact on consumer relations which can come back and haunt the record industry down the line.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

stock art of market data
stock art of market data

Maximize business value with data-driven strategies

Every organization is now collecting data, but few are truly data driven. Here are five ways data can transform your business.

Cryptocurrency fuels new business opportunities

As adoption of digital assets accelerates, companies are investing in innovative products and services.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.