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Laptop Tattoos

When it comes to new technology, personalization is always a good thing. Think computer game modifications. Or homemade Winamp skins. Or pop punk cell phone ring tones. Personalization sells. People like to feel a human connection with their high tech…
November 26, 2003

When it comes to new technology, personalization is always a good thing. Think computer game modifications. Or homemade Winamp skins. Or pop punk cell phone ring tones. Personalization sells. People like to feel a human connection with their high tech experiences. They want their machines to reflect their personalities. In the most McLuhanesque sense, they want their technology to be extensions of their bodies, minds, and souls.

A company called Voodoo is bringing personalization to laptops in a very forward-thinking way. In addition to configuring the hardware, consumers can configure the style – choosing from kandy-kolored shells like Laguna Seca Blue or Monza Olive, and even an assortment of laptop tattoos. The tattoos have a tribal, East Village NYC look, with funky names like the Mantis or the Bamboo Tiki Man. It’s a kind of smart, Lollapalooza aesthetic that speaks to the MTV generation without condescension. And it should be a model for every other gadget and gizmo on the market. The more consumers can leave their mark on their wares, the better.

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