Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Wireless Outreach

Electronic medical records help track and treat the homeless.

While many otherwise sophisticated U.S. hospitals have dithered about adopting them, electronic medical records are enhancing health care for a surprising population: the homeless.

Earlier this year, a nonprofit group called Healthcare for the Homeless-Houston installed five wireless access points around the city that enable field-workers, using handheld computers, to view real-time medical records. Rather than lugging paper charts around while doing street outreach, care providers view and update patient records on the spot, using software specially written for personal digital assistants by volunteer David Niemeyer, vice president of technology solutions for Healthlink, a Houston-based health-care consulting firm. The result: easier tracking of difficult-to-find patients and speedier delivery of health care and social services.

The technology has become “a cornerstone of our work,” says David Buck, a family physician at Baylor College of Medicine and president of the organization. What’s more, doctors and nurses can tap into indigent patients’ medical histories and easily update their records when they show up at a clinic or shelter.

Other cities may soon follow suit. Already, outreach groups in Boston and Indianapolis use electronic medical records. And Buck is making the software freely available to homeless-service agencies in New Orleans and elsewhere. Just don’t look for such sophistication at your local hospital, where doctors are probably still scribbling notes on paper pads.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Investing in people is key to successful transformation

People-related factors like talent attraction and retention and clear top-down communication will determine whether your transformation progresses or stalls.

Work reinvented: Tech will drive the office evolution

As organizations navigate a new world of hybrid work, tech innovation will be crucial for employee connection and collaboration.

The way forward: Merging IT and operations

Digital transformation in any industry begins with bridging the gap between two traditionally separate teams.

be a good example concept
be a good example concept

Be a good example

"It was in the newspaper, but the towers fell the next day, and what I’d done was quickly lost."

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.