Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Icy Flight

When American Eagle flight 4184 crashed near Roselawn, IN, in 1994, having accumulated a fatal amount of ice on its wings, aeronautics engineer Michael Bragg set out to make sure such accidents didn’t happen again. Bragg and his team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have since developed a smart icing system that does more than just alert the pilot when ice accumulates on the plane, as current instruments do. Sensors characterize how the ice buildup on the wings or tail is affecting the plane’s aerodynamics. If onboard heaters can’t melt away all the ice, Bragg’s system will tell the pilot how to compensate to maintain control and stability. The system consists of neural-network-based software that collects information from the sensors and translates the data into particular actions. Eventually, Bragg says, the technology will be able to automatically adjust the plane’s speed or wing-flap position. Bragg’s team recently conducted computer simulations and is preparing to flight test the system this winter.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Geoffrey Hinton tells us why he’s now scared of the tech he helped build

“I have suddenly switched my views on whether these things are going to be more intelligent than us.”

ChatGPT is going to change education, not destroy it

The narrative around cheating students doesn’t tell the whole story. Meet the teachers who think generative AI could actually make learning better.

Meet the people who use Notion to plan their whole lives

The workplace tool’s appeal extends far beyond organizing work projects. Many users find it’s just as useful for managing their free time.

Learning to code isn’t enough

Historically, learn-to-code efforts have provided opportunities for the few, but new efforts are aiming to be inclusive.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.