Skip to Content

Cinematic Video

September 1, 2001

Digital video has lately provided independent filmmakers with an inexpensive alternative to shooting film. The trade-off: it looks like video-that is, flat, and lacking film’s painterly quality and versatility (top). But San Francisco-based The Orphanage has developed software that gives video the richly textured look of film (bottom). The software gets rid of video’s distracting scan lines, softens its oversharpness, and adds lighting effects and color correction. The finished result can be converted to various formats, including streaming video and 35-millimeter film, with no loss of quality. This electronic manipulation is far less expensive than working with film. The technology will be showcased next month with the theatrical premiere of Chelsea Walls, a feature that was shot entirely on digital video. When will the camcorder brigade have a consumer version? “We’re working on it now,” says Scott Stewart, The Orphanage’s cofounder.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

A view of clouds illuminated by sunlight
A view of clouds illuminated by sunlight

We can’t afford to stop solar geoengineering research

It is the wrong time to take this strategy for combating climate change off the table.

conceptual illustration showing various women's faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women's faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

Death and Jeff Bezos
Death and Jeff Bezos

Meet Altos Labs, Silicon Valley’s latest wild bet on living forever

Funders of a deep-pocketed new "rejuvenation" startup are said to include Jeff Bezos and Yuri Milner.

ai learning to multitask concept
ai learning to multitask concept

Meta’s new learning algorithm can teach AI to multi-task

The single technique for teaching neural networks multiple skills is a step towards general-purpose AI.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.