Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Wake Up!

September 1, 2001

Asleep-at-the-wheel drivers are a deadly menace. But the drowsy-driver detectors that have come out of some labs have serious flaws. Lane monitors sense when a car is drifting astray, but by then the driver is already asleep. Eye-blink and head-bob sensors work well, but some people can actually fall asleep with eyes open and heads upright. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory has built a drowsy-driver detector that promises to be less easily fooled because it looks at overall body motion plus eye blinks. A windshield-mounted radar device scans the driver and detects motion, feeding the data to a program created by a team led by Henry Kues. When the driver first sits in the car, the program takes a baseline measurement of such normal movements as fidgeting, radio tuning and head turning. When movement slows and ceases-an indication that sleep is imminent-the program focuses on eye blinks. The lab is trying to license the technology.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Every year, we look for promising technologies poised to have a real impact on the world. Here are the advances that we think matter most right now.

Scientists are finding signals of long covid in blood. They could lead to new treatments.

Faults in a certain part of the immune system might be at the root of some long covid cases, new research suggests.

AI for everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Generative AI tools like ChatGPT reached mass adoption in record time, and reset the course of an entire industry.

What’s next for AI in 2024

Our writers look at the four hot trends to watch out for this year

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.