Skip to Content

Stroke Sensor

Each year, strokes afflict about 600,000 Americans-killing almost 160,000 and disabling many others. Most occur without warning. Magnetic resonance imaging and arteriograms can detect conditions that presage stroke but are expensive, time consuming and sometimes painful. A new sensor that sits on the eyelid may provide a cheap, noninvasive method of screening for brain aneurysms (bulges in blood vessels that can burst, depriving the brain of blood) and for blockages that can limit blood to the brain.

Electronics engineers in Kenji Kobayashi’s lab at Takushoku University in Hachioji, Japan, developed the thin plastic sensor, which detects the vibrations caused by blood flow. Aneurysms and blockages change the flow and hence the vibrations. In tests, the device accurately detected aneurysms small enough for surgeons to repair before they were likely to bleed; it also identified vessels that had narrowed by 30 percent. Additional testing is needed before the device is considered reliable enough for clinical use.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

The problem with plug-in hybrids? Their drivers.

Plug-in hybrids are often sold as a transition to EVs, but new data from Europe shows we’re still underestimating the emissions they produce.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

An AI startup made a hyperrealistic deepfake of me that’s so good it’s scary

Synthesia's new technology is impressive but raises big questions about a world where we increasingly can’t tell what’s real.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.