Skip to Content

Tomorrow’s Transistors

Follow-up

In TR’s special issue on the future of computing (Beyond Silicon, TR May/June 2000), we documented efforts to replace silicon with computers based on quantum effects, DNA and organic molecules. Advances reported in each of these areas in August have brought the technologies closer to reality.

A collaboration led by IBM Research’s Isaac Chuang (one of the TR100) created an advanced quantum computer that was able to solve in one step a mathematical problem that requires repeated steps in a conventional computer.

Chemists at the University of California, Los Angeles made an on/off switch using an organic molecule and predict they will soon have working memory for the molecular computer they are building with researchers at Hewlett-Packard.

Scientists at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs and Oxford University reported in the journal Nature that they had built a minuscule motor out of DNA, work that could one day lead to the nanofabrication of functioning

Keep Reading

Most Popular

How scientists traced a mysterious covid case back to six toilets

When wastewater surveillance turns into a hunt for a single infected individual, the ethics get tricky.

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

The problem with plug-in hybrids? Their drivers.

Plug-in hybrids are often sold as a transition to EVs, but new data from Europe shows we’re still underestimating the emissions they produce.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.