Skip to Content

Punctuated Evolution

From the editor in chief
November 1, 2000

Two and a half years ago, this magazine underwent a revolutionary transformation, emerging with a new design, a new staff and a new editorial focus on the process of innovation-a fact we proudly announced on our cover, which described us as “MIT’s Magazine of Innovation,” a tag we still bear. That was the revolution.

But change doesn’t end after the barricades have been stormed and a new regime has been installed in place of the old one. In fact, the change of regime was just the beginning of the process needed to make the new Technology Review a great magazine. How does a magazine continue to improve after it relaunches itself? Largely by listening to its readers.We’ve been listening hard over the last two and a half years, both formally, in statistically valid sample surveys of our audience, and informally, via letters, e-mail, phone calls and face-to-face conversations.

We’ve learned a lot from this concentrated listening.We’ve learned that, of the different kinds of stories we offer, those that focus directly on the technology rather than the people, organizations and strategies involved in innovation resonate most strongly with our readers. We’ve learned that information technology, though not an exclusive passion, is very much at the top of people’s minds. And we’ve learned that the technology horizon is relatively circumscribed: Most readers are interested in technologies that will reach the marketplace in the foreseeable future-the next three years or so.

Now we are combining those three lessons into a plan for what we will offer you over the next year: a magazine focusing directly on emerging technology, with an emphasis (though far from an exclusive emphasis) on information technology and a relatively near-term time frame. That’s the evolution.

This evolutionary process will be especially visible in our next issue, January/February 2001, a special issue on the “State of Innovation.” That issue will incorporate a set of significant changes in the design, content and staff of the magazine, as well as in its frequency. I’ll spell out things in more detail in my next column.

These changes are exciting for us here on Vassar Street, and they mark a milestone for the new Technology Review .But all major milestones are bittersweet, and the bitter part of this one is that, as we evolve, we will be parting company with some people who have played a key role in the success we’ve enjoyed so far.

Specifically, this issue marks the last regular appearance in our pages of four writers: Michael Dertouzos, Stephen S. Hall,Wade Roush and G. Pascal Zachary. Each has written a regular column that added enormously to the richness and flavor of the new Technology Review. Each of those writers, however, has other important challenges to go on to, and we will present four new columnists in the next issue.

As we part, I’d like to offer heartfelt thanks to these four writers, who took a chance on a new and untried concept-a magazine from MIT about the process of innovation-and devoted their considerable talents to making it a success. Michael, Steve,Wade, Gregg, thanks to each of you for your inspiration and professionalism.

And now, on to the evolution.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other
conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other

Forget dating apps: Here’s how the net’s newest matchmakers help you find love

Fed up with apps, people looking for romance are finding inspiration on Twitter, TikTok—and even email newsletters.

computation concept
computation concept

How AI is reinventing what computers are

Three key ways artificial intelligence is changing what it means to compute.

still from Embodied Intelligence video
still from Embodied Intelligence video

These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems

They show how intelligence and body plans are closely linked—and could unlock AI for robots.

We reviewed three at-home covid tests. The results were mixed.

Over-the-counter coronavirus tests are finally available in the US. Some are more accurate and easier to use than others.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.