Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Mobile Security, a mobile seucrity news site maintained by Symantec’s Norton antivirus business, has published an interesting three-part blog series on the origins and rise of mobile malware–an issue that’s increasingly important as more and more of us snatch up smartphones and tablets.

There are a number of neat tidbits mentioned in the posts, such as the fact that mobile malware first emerged nearly nine years ago, in June 2004, when security researchers received copies of Cabir, a mobile worm written in C++ that targeted the Symbian operating system. Cabir spread via Bluetooth, adding a file to the phone, and was actually quite benign: when you turned on the phone, it showed the word “Caribe” on the screen. Cabir wasn’t released to infect consumers’ phones, but it was used by hackers to build other viruses that emerged shortly thereafter.

If you’d like to check out all three posts, you can find them here, here, and here.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Mobile Summit 2013

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »