Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

The founder of Dropbox, Drew Houston, told Technology Review in February that he’s trying to build “the Internet’s file system”. News that the company has bought Audiogalaxy, a company whose software would stream your music collection over Internet to another computer or phone, suggests Dropbox may also being trying to be the Internet’s music player.

Houston has long talked about intending to do more than simply move people’s files from one place to another, saying to us:

Even though today people may think of Dropbox as a magic folder on their desktop, what we’re really excited about is the opportunity to make all this other stuff you use better. We envision little Dropbox icons everywhere…[a]ny app or device should be able to plug into Dropbox and have access to all your stuff, because that’s where it resides.

Should Dropbox decide to offer music streaming it will be competing with similar services from Amazon and Google, both of which allow people to upload their collections for later playback.

If Dropbox does that, a side benefit could be that many more people bumping up against the two gigabyte storage limit of a free account, due to the relative heft of music files. That could help the company convince more people to start paying for the service.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Computing, Web

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me