Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

Edeniq’s pilot facility in California has tested its enzymatic hydrolysis process on different feedstocks. Credit: Endeniq.

Of the many approaches to making biofuel from non-food sources, locating a cellulosic ethanol line at an existing corn or sugar cane ethanol plant promises to be one that lowers capital costs.

Biofuel startup Edeniq this week said it has begun construction of a demonstration-scale cellulosic ethanol operation at a sugar cane plant owned by Usina Vale in Brazil. Edeniq’s process will make fuel from bagasse, the material left over after juice has been extracted from sugar cane plants. The ethanol will be added to the plant’s existing production.

The amount of money needed for this “bolt-on” is lower than building a stand-alone facility, says Edeniq CEO Brian Thome. In addition to technical and engineering problems, many advanced biofuels companies have struggled to fund large-scale operations since financiers are wary of new technology.

“The whole goal all long has been to plug in and utilize the billions of dollars already put into the industry in the U.S. and Brazil,” Thome says.

Thome wouldn’t say how much Edeniq’s fuel costs per gallon but he said the capital and operating costs are within the same range as corn or sugar ethanol plant. The technology also allows ethanol plant operators to make use of bagasse or corn stover without the logistics of transporting the feedstock. At Usina Vale’s plant, the bagasse is currently burned to help run the machines.

Edeniq has developed proprietary machines for crushing feedstock, which can be bagasse or corn stover, the plant material from corn stalks. After pretreatment, biomass is treated with enzymes to convert it into sugar water, which is then fermented into ethanol.

This plant, expected to be open in the middle of next year, will process 20 dry tons a day of bagasse, a step up from a two-ton-a-day pilot plant in California which was funded mostly by the DOE, Thome says. The company has plans for larger plants either in the U.S. or Brazil. India, another sugar cane producing country, has potential for bagasse ethanol production. 

This bolt-on approach is being tried by other biofuel companies as a way to leverage existing corn or sugar cane facilities. Poet next year will open a corn cob-to-ethanol plant, called Project Liberty, next to one of its existing corn ethanol facility in Iowa. 

 

5 comments. Share your thoughts »

Tagged: biofuel, advanced biofuels, cellulosic ethanol

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me