Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

A hard-to-treat form of breast cancer sometimes called “triple negative” is more like certain kinds of ovarian and lung cancers than like other breast cancers, and so doctors may be able to treat it with drugs known to work in tumors in these different tissues, suggests the latest report from the Cancer Genome Atlas.  

Much of what genomics is teaching us about cancer is that every cancer type and even every tumor is different at the genetic and molecular level (not to mention that different parts of a tumor can have molecular changes not found throughout). But researchers are also finding that tumors from different parts of the body can be more alike than tumors found in the same organ, as was shown in Sunday’s report in Nature.

As Christopher Benz, an oncologist at the University of California San Francisco, told the San Francisco Chronicle: 

“We’re going to move farther and farther from the practice of classifying cancers by where they arise and more and more by what their molecular composition and wiring is all about.” 

This study is the latest report from the Cancer Genome Atlas, an NIH-funded project that will examine the genomic and molecular landscapes of at least 20 tumor types.


1 comment. Share your thoughts »

Tagged: Biomedicine, cancer, genomics

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me