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Apple CEO Steve Jobs kicked off the usual media frenzy yesterday, but not by announcing a new product. Instead, Jobs announced his resignation from the position of CEO. Though Jobs will continue to serve as chairman of the board for Apple, the move represents the end of an era. Jobs became known in particular for his ferocious commitment to design. Over the years at Technology Review, we’re featured a number of hacks inside key Apple products. What we always found when we opened Apple devices up is that the minimalist, ordered look the company favors goes far more than skin deep. The inside of an iPad, for example, is every bit as exacting and perfectly ordered as its exterior—and hard to coax into unintended uses. The following shows three classic hacks:

The Apple I (See Interactive)



The iPhone (See Interactive)


The iPad 3G (See Interactive)




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Tagged: Computing, Apple, iPhone, iPad, hack, Steve Jobs

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