Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Credit: Technology Review


This is not your mom’s snowboard. At the Society for Information Display this week, reflective-display company E Ink is exhibiting a number of prototypes that hint at future products. Definitely the most whimsical is a snowboard with a semi-circular black and white display showing a compass, clock, and weather predictions.

The idea is not to give grandparents nightmares about teens reading text messages while plowing down mountainsides, but to demonstrate future directions for the company’s flexible, rugged, low-power displays. E Ink, which is owned by Taiwanese company Prime View International, makes the black-and-white displays found in e-readers such as the Kindle. Their displays are also found in some cell phones and niche products.

The low power requirements for these displays—once the image changes, it doesn’t require any power to maintain it—and good readability under sunlight will, the company hopes, enable them to expand into a broader range of products. The company has started to get these displays in point-of-sale display ads in stores. Combined with static color images, the black-and-white E Ink backing flashing on and off makes an ad for detergent or athletic shoes appear animated.

Another fun was a music stand that would display the music instead of holding it up, with a foot pedal at the bottom to turn the page. In the latest generation of products, the displays now switch fast enough to write on the music, which you will need to do when the conductor yells at you to play louder in the sixth measure.

Credit: Technology Review



0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Computing, displays, E ink, display week

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »