Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Twitter is changing its site to make it easier to use and navigate, and to give more context to posts that people see on its website. The changes will add a variety of informative panels to supplement the rapid exchange of information that’s always taking place on the site.

For example, Twitter users often post links to pictures and videos. The new site will pull those onto the page so that people don’t have to leave to view that content. Twitter has accomplished this in part through partnerships with companies that provide these services.

The new site will also provide contextual information for tweets, giving users related posts, for example. It will also make it easier to see profile information about who has posted a tweet without navigating away from the page.

Though the individual changes may seem small, together they suggest a focus on the aesthetics of the site that Twitter historically hasn’t had time for. The site has spent most of its life trying to keep its head above water and prevent crashes from being too frequent.

The changes also seem likely to make people spend more time on the Twitter home page, rather than navigating away from it constantly. This could affect the group of applications that have grown up to supplement Twitter, in some cases undermining their functionality. It’s also possible that the changes will make advertisements on Twitter more valuable. They could be coupled more closely to other content, and there might be more opportunities to present them.

A small group of users already has the new Twitter, and the company expects to add everyone in slowly over the next few weeks.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Web, Twitter, Design, ads, application platform

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »