Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

In recent years, in the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics has run a gallery of fluid motion at its annual meet. This year’s meeting in Minneapolis in November is no different and the wannabe stars of the silver screen are starting to post their entries on the arXiv. In the coming weeks, I’ll highlight any that look interesting .

Today, I’ll point to a computer simulation of a plunging breaking wave by Paul Adams at the Unclassified Data Analysis and Assessment Center of US Army Engineering Research and Development Center and a few mates.

What’s interesting about this simulation is the amount of air that becomes trapped in the water as the wave breaks. Ocean-air mixing is an important part of many climate models but difficult to measure, so simulations like these may turn out to provide useful parameters.

The videos are here along with some other impressive simulations of ships in waves and ship motions.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/0910.2580: A Numerical Simulation of a Plunging Breaking Wave

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Computing

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me