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The list of scientists who have had their genomes sequenced is growing rapidly. First was Craig Venter, who used his own DNA in the race to sequence the first human genome. Then came James Watson, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, who had his genome sequenced and published in 2007. In August, Stephen Quake, a bioengineer at Stanford (and TR35 winner in 2002) announced he had sequenced the first human genome using single molecule sequencing technology–his own. Now George Church, a genomics pioneer and leader of the Personal Genome Project, finally has his genome sequence. His was one of 14 that startup Complete Genomics announced it had sequenced last week. (Church had already sequenced some of his DNA as part of the PGP.) Another scientist, not yet publicly identified, has also sequenced his own genome, identifying the probable cause of a rare genetic disorder.

Marjolein Kriek, a Dutch clinical geneticist at the University of Leiden, is the only female scientist to have sequenced her genome, though the results have not yet been published. The only female genome sequence that has been published to date was done by Elaine Mardis’s team at Washington University.

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Tagged: Biomedicine, sequencing, human genome, Complete Genomics

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