Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

Sundance is upon us, and the traditional media will once again descend upon Park City, Utah, looking for this year’s breakout hits. However, the Hollywood Reporter has an interesting piece about how the blogosphere has helped transform the independent movie circuit.

Also, Amazon.com announced it would have a weekly entertainment show online, hosted by Bill Maher. The idea: spotlight authors and musicians – who, one can only assume, will be prominently sold on Amazon. Maybe QVC is on to something.

Yet the digital world doesn’t seem to be doing much for those trying to break into the entertainment business. Reuters has a story about “one of the first” bands to break out online. (Actually, the first band to do that was Fisher, which hit it big through MP3.com.)

The heavyweights, though, are still the heavyweights, as Larry Lessig stole my writing partner’s idea to host a virtual book tour. Yesterday, Lessig made an appearance in Second Life.

And my friends over at Apple are having a time. First, the company had to back-track on its iTunes store, which was potentially collecting data on user’s activities (or, as the BBC puts it: An investigation by bloggers found that the recommendation system used unique identifiers for each user in a way that could compromise privacy); and, second, a company that sells video iPods may find itself running afoul of the law, by pre-loading DVDs onto the devices before shipping them to customs.

We don’t want to end on a downer, though, so here’s some good news. With all of this entertainment moving to PCs and mobile devices, you’ll be happy to know that using handhelds will not cause cancer.

6 comments. Share your thoughts »

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me