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To boost the electricity that wind farms can generate, Siemens has developed what it calls the world’s longest rotor blades for wind turbines. The bigger the blade, the more wind energy it can capture; with three of these 75-meter blades, a single turbine can generate six megawatts of electricity. To make the blade this big without making it too heavy, Siemens produces it as a single piece of fiberglass-reinforced resin and balsa wood, without seams or joints. Intended for offshore wind farms, where winds are generally strong and steady, the blade will get its first test this fall at a power station off the coast of Denmark

Product: B75 Rotor Blades
Cost: Not disclosed
Availability: Now
Company: Siemens

Credit: David Scharf/Science Faction/Corbis; Courtesy of Siemens

Tagged: Energy, Siemens

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