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A device that analyzes blood levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is one of the first doctor’s-office uses of microfluidics–technology that can manipulate fluids on a chip at microscopic scales. When a cartridge bearing a blood sample is inserted into the tabletop device, an accurate reading can be completed in 15 minutes, helping monitor the health of patients with prostate cancer. The procedure used now involves sending a sample to a lab for analysis, which often takes a day or two. The device received European approval in June.


Credit: Christopher Harting

Product: Claros DX 1

Cost: To be announced in late 2010

Availability: Late 2010 in selected European markets

Source: www.clarosdx.com

Company: Claros

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Tagged: Biomedicine

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