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Open-Source Automobile
Not long after the U.S. Department of Energy moved to end most federal support for fuel-cell transportation, the U.K.-based startup Riversimple has dived into the uncertain waters of the hydrogen economy with a tiny fuel-cell-powered car. The prototype of the hydrogen-powered vehicle is about the size of a golf cart. Though small, the body, made from carbon composites, is tough. Each wheel is powered by its own electric motor, and ultracapacitors store energy captured during braking. The car has a range of 320 kilometers and a top speed of 80 kilometers per hour. Riversimple is releasing the design under an open-source license. Its business model will be to lease cars to owners, with the cost of the hydrogen fuel included in the lease price. Owners will refill their cars at stations that ­Riversimple plans to build in urban areas.



Product: Riversimple hydrogen car

Cost: N/A

Source: www.riversimple.com

Company: Riversimple

1 comment. Share your thoughts »

Tagged: Energy, hydrogen, fuel cell, hydrogen cars, hydrogen fuel cells

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