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Monitoring Heart Failure

A 15-centimeter wireless sensor (right) approved this spring by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is part of a monitoring system now being marketed. The system spots signs of heart failure by detecting fluid buildup in the lungs and elsewhere in the body–a hallmark of heart failure–and analyzing the patient’s activity levels, heart rate, and respiration. When attached to a patient’s chest, it beams data to a special cell-phone-like gadget in the person’s pocket or somewhere nearby. From there, the information is wirelessly transmitted to the company’s servers. Algorithms detect anomalies, and physicians receive the data via the Web or a mobile device.

Credit: Bruce Peterson

Product: PiiX sensor device; zLink portable transmitter

Cost: $400 to $700

Source: www.corventis.com

Company: Corventis

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Tagged: Computing, Biomedicine

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