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A traditional GPS receiver needs to process data from at least four satellites to determine its position; in a ­location-aware camera, that’s a huge battery drain. A GPS camera using a new system from Geotate, however, requires just a fraction as much satellite information. Once photos have been transferred from the camera to a computer, software queries a database of historic GPS data to determine where they were taken. By delegating all the computational work to the computer, the system allows the camera to consume only one-hundredth as much power as a conventional GPS receiver does.

Product: Capture and Process system

Cost: $299 for a location-aware camera; less than $50 for a hot-shoe add-on or a separate handheld unit

Source: www.geotate.com

Company: Geotate

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Tagged: Computing, GPS, location awareness

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