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Story Archive

  • White Matter

    Biomedical editor Emily Singer had a diffusion tensor scan, a variation of MRI that allows scientists to visualize the brain’s white matter, at UCLA. Neuroscientist Andrew Frew used brain imaging software from BrainLab to create these movies, highlighting different sections of white matter.

  • Brain Imaging and IQ

    Richard Haier, a psychologist and emeritus professor at the University of California, Irvine, explains how brain imaging is shedding light on intelligence.

  • Mining Fool's Gold for Solar

    Berkeley researcher Cyrus Wadia talks about his vision for the future of solar energy and demonstrates how to make a solar cell from fool’s gold.

  • Apollo's Rocket Scientists

    What is the legacy of the Apollo program, and what can we learn from it to help us confront the scientific and engineering challenges of our own time? This short film kicked off the “Giant Leaps” Symposium commemorating the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing. The symposium was organized by the MIT Aeronautics and Astronautics Department, and held at MIT on June 11, 2009.

  • Tagging the World

    This video explains the Bokode concept of embedding small optical tags easily readable by normal cameras.

  • Robofish

    This robofish prototype, less than a foot long, swims via a single motor.

  • Falling, Unwinding, Cascading

    Kinetic sculptor Arthur Ganson is a former artist in residence at MIT and the inventor of the foam construction toy Toobers and Zots. He led the Friday After Thanksgiving Chain Reaction at the MIT Museum in 2008.

  • Prescription: Networking

    Boston Medical Center is one of a relative few of U.S. hospitals that have managed to break down bureaucratic barriers to exchange electronic medical records with community health centers having different owners—a first step toward statewide and nationwide exchanges to improve health-care quality and reduce waste. Meg Aranow, the hospital’s chief information officer, and Andrew Ulrich, an emergency department physician, describe the rationale for and emerging uses of this electronic-records network now serving many of Boston’s inner-city patients.

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