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Body search: This CT image shows organs and other features identified by the Microsoft software. A list of these features appears at left.

Kenji Suzuki an assistant professor at the University of Chicago, whose research group works on similar tools, says the Microsoft software has the potential to improve patient care, providing it really does make scans easier to navigate. “As medical imaging has advanced, so many images are produced that there is a kind of information overload,” he explains. “The workload has grown a lot.”

Suzuki says Microsoft’s approach is a good one, but that medical professionals might be more receptive to the design if it indexed signs of disease, not just organs. His own research group has developed software capable of recognizing potentially cancerous lung nodules; in trials, it made half as many mistakes as a human expert.

Criminisi sticks by the notion of using organs as a kind of navigation system but says that disease-spotting capability is also under development. He says, “We are working to train it to detect differences between different grades of glioma tumor”—a type of brain tumor.

The Microsoft group also intends the tool to be used at large scales. It could automatically index a collection of 3-D scans or other images, making possible new ways of tracking medical records, says Criminisi. Today, records are kept as text that describes scans and other information. A search tool that finds the word “heart”, for example, would not know if that meant it appeared in a scan or was mentioned in another context. If a hospital’s computer system indexed new scans, the Microsoft software could automatically record what was imaged in a person’s records and when.

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Credits: Microsoft Research
Video by Microsoft Research

Tagged: Computing, Biomedicine, Microsoft, imaging, health care, research, health IT, electronic medical records

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