Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

Many species naturally make small amounts of hydrocarbons. Now researchers at the startup LS9, based in South San Francisco, CA, have described the genes and enzymes responsible for this production of alkanes, the major components of fuels such as diesel. The findings, reported in the current issue of the journal Science, have allowed the researchers to engineer E. coli bacteria that can secrete alkane hydrocarbons capable of being burned in diesel engines.

LS9 had previously reported using bacteria to produce hydrocarbon fuel, but this is the first time the researchers have revealed how they did it. “This is the first characterization of these enzymes. Virtually nothing was known about what enzymes were responsible, and how do they do it,” says Frances Arnold, a professor of chemical engineering, bioengineering, and biochemistry at Caltech. Arnold was not involved in the LS9 work. The discovery “opens up a whole new set of possibilities,” she says. “These reactions are very interesting. Nature has made a few versions of them. Now, in the laboratory, we can make many more versions, so your imagination can run wild.” Any commercial applications Arnold and others discover, however, will likely require a licensing agreement with LS9, which has filed for a patent for its discovery.

The LS9 researchers discovered the genes involved by comparing the genomes of 10 strains of cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae) that naturally produce alkanes with a very similar strain that produces no alkanes. They identified 20 genes that the alkane-producing strains had but that the non-alkane-producing strain lacked. From there, the researchers narrowed down the possibilities until they identified the genes and enzymes necessary for alkane production. They confirmed their discovery by incorporating the genes into E. coli and measuring the alkanes that the bacteria subsequently made. The bacteria secrete the alkanes, which can then by easily collected and used as a fuel.

Organisms make alkanes via a complex process that produces fatty acids from carbon dioxide or sugars. The fatty acids are then converted by the organisms to an aldehyde that includes a carbon atom bonded to an oxygen atom (together they create what’s called a carbonyl group). The enzyme aldehyde decarbonylase helps remove this group to form a chain of hydrogen and carbon atoms–the hydrocarbon. The natural process produces a collection of hydrocarbons of various lengths that are comparable to the hydrocarbon molecules in diesel.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Credit: Andreas Schirmer, LS9

Tagged: Energy, biofuel, diesel, enzymes, LS9, cyanobacteria

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me