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An open-source Web-based operating system called eyeOS is getting a big boost from IBM. The computer giant has begun selling high-end mainframe servers with eyeOS pre-installed, hoping the operating system will entice customers who are hesitant about using cloud computing.

Managed by a small company based in Barcelona, eyeOS lets users access a virtual desktop through a Web browser. The user can treat that virtual desktop like the desktop of a regular PC, launching and running applications within it.

Though individuals can use the operating system over the Internet through a site hosted by eyeOS, IBM makes it possible for customers to host the service themselves. With the software installed on the mainframe server, a company could offer virtual desktops to its employees, who could then access their “work computers” from any device.

Unlike projects like Google’s ChromeOS, which is designed to let people access the entire world of Web applications through the browser, eyeOS is designed to access a specific set of applications “installed” on the virtual desktop. Using the system, an organization could provide employees with productivity applications, its own custom applications, and access to proprietary data. The ability to access these through a single Web-based operating system, says the project’s founder, Pau Garcia-Mila, saves users from needing passwords to different Web-based services. It also allows the applications to be more compatible with each other.

Cloud computing most often means running data and applications on remote servers hosted by a company such as Amazon.com. New technologies allow the hosting company to share its processing and storage resources efficiently among all its customers, enabling it to offer low prices. Customers of cloud providers save money because the rates are low, they don’t have to buy their own equipment, and they can buy just as much computing power as they need, changing the quantity as their demands fluctuate.

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Credits: Technology Review, eyeOS

Tagged: Computing, cloud computing, virtualization, webOS

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