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No matter how much money you spend on a cell phone, the Web you see on its small screen isn’t quite the same as the one you view on a laptop. Some features often can’t run on mobile-phone Web browsers. But the latest version of Opera Mobile could bring more of the Web to your mobile world. Capable of displaying full Flash media content, Opera Mobile version 9.5 makes it possible to use cell phones and handheld computers to view online animations and movies.

Stripped-down versions of the Web have been offered to mobile users in the past. But these have been widely viewed as flops, says Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Opera Software, based in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. “There is only one Web, and that’s what the end user wants,” he says.

Recently, there have been improvements in the design of mobile browsers and their user interfaces in an effort to deliver a more complete Web-browsing experience via mobile devices. But even the swanky browser in Apple’s iPhone doesn’t support Flash, which puts a limit on the content that users can access with the device.

“A full version of Flash inside the browser makes it possible for users to view the normal versions of video-based websites like YouTube or DailyMotion,” says Ian Fogg, research director with London-based analyst firm Jupiter Research.

Some phones offer a lightweight version, called Flash Lite–which is how iPhone users are able to access YouTube–but it has reduced sound and video quality, and only a small minority of devices offer it.

Opera Software was spun out of the Norwegian telecom company Telenor in 1995 and is famed for concentrating almost exclusively on mobile browsing. In addition to offering Flash, the company claims that its latest version can run 2.5 times faster than Microsoft’s mobile browser. “Speed is our focus,” says von Tetzchner. It is something that the company is very proud of, and it’s largely due to optimizing the code so that it runs more efficiently on the limited processing resources of a mobile device, he says.

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Credit: Opera

Tagged: Web, software, mobile internet

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