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A Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Toy Car
Most people think that hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles will never be more than rare curiosities. But there is a small, sporty model that makes a great gift: Horizon Fuel Cell TechnologiesH-racer. The miniature, zero-emissions vehicle is equipped with a hydrogen storage tank and a fuel-cell system connected to the car’s electric motor. H-racer’s external fueling station generates hydrogen gas through electrolysis using energy from a solar panel or, if necessary, batteries. A small balloon inside the car serves as the hydrogen storage tank. Once filled, it steadily releases the gas into the fuel cell where it reacts with oxygen to generate the electricity that propels the car’s motor. It takes a mere 10 minutes to refuel with enough power to let the car run in a straight line for three minutes–that’s about 325 feet on a full tank. The H-racer retails on the company’s website for $115, but it can be found elsewhere online for as little as $59.95. A kit to convert your own remote-controlled car to hydrogen power is available for $1,500.

Credit: Horizon Fuel Cell Technologies

A Personal Genome Sequence
If you’ve got $350,000 to blow, a personal genome sequence would make the perfect gift for that special hypochondriac on your list. Earlier this year, Knome, a startup based in Cambridge, MA, began offering genome sequencing to consumers at $350,000 a pop. Hidden within that DNA is information about an individual’s risk of up to 2,000 common and rare conditions. But you’d better hurry: due to the massive amount of work involved in sequencing a genome, only the first 20 people who contact the company will get to be part of Knome’s first sequencing flight; interested parties can find out more here.

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Tagged: Business, DNA, genome, sensor, wireless, Wi-Fi

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