Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Since Apple unveiled its iTunes Music Store in spring 2003, bloggers have batted around the idea that the company chose the name cleverly – because “Music” could be changed easily to “Media” when it started selling online movies. Three years later, although movies have not yet appeared on the iTunes site, it has sold more than 15 million digitized TV shows and videos (for $1.99 a pop), with the blessing of ABC, Disney, Showtime, NBC, MTV, and other providers.

Not surprisingly, then, the success of these online TV shows and videos has accelerated speculation about movies. Last week, Variety, Forbes, and MSNBC all ran stories about rights and pricing negotiations between Apple and the major movie studios. The consensus: It’s just a matter of time before iTunes starts selling feature-length movies, if not this year, then in 2007.

For Internet video distributors, though, the Motion Picture Association of America has been a tougher nut to crack than television studios, because the film industry is more concerned about piracy.

Aside from the wrangling over copyright and digital-rights management, though, technical problems also stand in the way of an iTunes Movie Store. Actually, it’s one key technical issue. While Apple already has a high-profile storefront, marketing mechanism, and suitable file format for delivering movies, figuring out how to deliver these massive, multi-gigabyte files remains a challenge.

Whether a consumer has a dialup or a broadband connection, it takes only a few minutes to download a song from iTunes. The Lord of the Rings trilogy would be several thousand times larger – yet have to be downloaded at the same rate.

Choosing a file format carefully can mitigate the problem, but only somewhat. Apple owns the QuickTime format, whose latest QuickTime 7 Pro version, includes the H.264 compression/decompression standard, which is also used in the new generation of Blu-ray and HD-DVD formats. It compresses data into a much smaller space than the MPEG-2 codec used on DVDs. As a result, a DVD-quality movie rendered in H.264 will take up half as much room on a disk drive and be twice as quick to download. (The H.264 standard is also designed to allow viewing at many different scales, from low resolution for 3G cell phones and video iPods to high-definition versions with 1,080 lines of vertical resolution.)

But the HD movie trailers that Apple currently offers on its website still weigh in at more than 100 megabytes. And even with H.264 compression, an entire movie would amount to well over one gigabyte and take an entire evening to download at the 1.5-megabits-per-second maximum cable or DSL modem speed available to most Internet users in the United States – which lags far behind many other developed nations in the capacity of its “broadband” links to residences. (The average South Korean household, for example, has 10-megabit-per-second access to the Internet.)

“This is one of the reasons why there’s no activity taking place” in movie downloads, says Frank Casanova, director of QuickTime Product Marketing at Apple. With a 1.5-gigabyte movie file, “you could request a movie from Netflix [which delivers DVDs by mail] before this download gets to you.” (Casanova said this even as rumors were breaking that Netflix was investing money in a movie download service.)

Specialized Internet service providers, such as Speakeasy, can double the speed of a home broadband connection, to 3.0 megabits per second. But these services cost roughly $80 per month, twice as much as standard DSL or cable modem Internet service, and gigabyte-sized movie files would still take hours to download. Consider that for an extra $40 a viewer could rent more than a dozen DVDs from a video store.

6 comments. Share your thoughts »

Tagged: Communications

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »