Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

You’re engrossed in a movie at the Cineplex when your cell phone starts vibrating. Do you take the call-and irritate fellow filmgoers? Les Nelson at the FX Palo Alto Laboratory (the research lab of Fuji-Xerox) has developed a less intrusive solution: Quiet Calls, a device that, at the push of a button, puts through inconvenient calls but first plays a prerecorded voice message, such as, “I can’t talk now, but I can listen-go ahead.” Quiet Calls could eventually be built into cell phones; the prototype is an attachment that plugs into the phone’s voice input jack and that provides a three-button keypad to execute up to nine responses (photo). Why not just use text messaging? Says Nelson, “Sometimes you need voice interaction.”

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Business

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »