Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Multimedia

  • Knee Power

    A new human-powered generator tries to capture walking energy.

  • NASA's New Planetary-Exploring Robot

    NASA’s newest exploration rover, dubbed Axel for its design, can climb steep and rocky terrain and explore deep craters on planets like Mars. It uses only three actuators to operate upside down, right side up, turn in place, and follow illogical paths. Axel can maneuver autonomously using cameras, sensors, and wireless communication, or be tethered to a larger spacecraft.

  • A Robomedic for the Battlefield

    Scientists at Carnegie Mellon have engineered a snakelike robotic arm that can monitor health signs and potentially administer treatments. The robot is equipped with sensors and a small camera, which wirelessly relays video to a laptop. A researcher watches the video onscreen and wirelessly controls the robot’s movements with a joystick. The robot can move anywhere along the length of the body, and can lower itself to administer oxygen or monitor a person’s breathing.

  • The Army's Remote-Controlled Beetle

    A scientist sends a wireless signal from the laptop to the beetle to start and then stop flight. The beetle, seen in the upper part of the frame, is tethered for practical purposes. The insect is attached to a clear plate, so that its flight pattern can be better observed. An oscilloscope shows the electrical signals as they are delivered: a short oscillating pulse triggers the animal to flap its wings, and it continues flapping until a short single pulse tells it to stop.

Pages

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me