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  • A Secret Tool for the U.S. Swim Team

    Swimmer Ariana Kukors presses her fingers into a device built to measure the force she generates with her freestyle kick. (She doesn’t hold on to anything.) The red vertical line shows the amount of force at a point in time. Kukors’s kick is strong and consistent, which is why the wave signal generally has the same amplitude throughout the recording.

  • Drawing Circuits with Nano Pens

    Each white square is a polymer nano pen. When the pen tips make contact with a surface, the amount of light that they reflect increases, allowing for easy monitoring of the writing process.

  • The Brain Unmasked

    This animation was generated from a normal human subject. It shows only the fibers that originate in a particular cross section of the brain. The blue arc in the middle of the brain is part of the cingulum bundle. Radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital are beginning to use this method to examine their patients’ brain: it provides a quick way to scan through the entire set of data for abnormalities.

  • Sun + Water = Fuel

    With catalysts created by an MIT chemist, sunlight can turn water into hydrogen. If the process can scale up, it could make solar power a dominant source of energy.

  • Controlling a Gut Bot's Position

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have made a swallowable capsule robot that they can anchor to specific spots in the gut. In the center of the capsule robot rests a leg; the transparent polymer elastomer footpad is visible. The footpads are covered with oil-coated micropillars that stick to tissue without damaging it.

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