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MIT News Feature

  • The Body Electric

    Hugh Herr, SM ’93, isn’t just developing more capable prosthetic limbs. He’s rethinking what humans can do.

  • The Practical Activist

    After pioneering the techniques of tissue engineering, Linda Griffith is getting scientists to tackle diseases half the population is often too embarrassed to talk about.

  • A Farewell to Arms

    As the Cold War ended, MIT researcher Thomas Neff came up with a plan to fuel U.S. nuclear plants with uranium from Russian bombs. With more than a decade of quiet diplomacy, he pulled it off.

  • A Match Made in the Heavens

    Jennifer Wiseman ’87 and Mark Shelhamer, ScD ’90, bonded over their love of space at MIT. Today they’re married, and both are senior scientists at NASA.

  • Readying Robots for the Real World

    Robots can handle complex tasks in highly controlled industrial settings. But as MIT’s team in the DARPA Robotics Challenge can attest, getting them to work in disaster sites is much more daunting—and much more interesting.

  • Dr. Adventure

    For most people, becoming chief anesthesiologist at a major teaching hospital would leave no time for anything else. But Warren Zapol ’62 also managed to develop a life-saving medical treatment and lead Antarctic research expeditions.

  • Mens et Apparata

    Creating artificial intelligence turns out to be far more challenging than anyone expected. But the new Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines is ready to try again. This time, computer scientists, biologists, and neuroscientists will be tackling the problem together.

    1 comment

  • Build Thyself

    In his self-assembly lab, Skylar Tibbits, SM ’10, is testing the boundaries of what he calls 4-D printing.

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