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Waving a Smart card in front of a radio frequency identification (RFID) reader can provide access to buildings, pay for subway rides, and even initiate credit-card transactions. With more than a billion units sold, the NXP Mifare Classic RFID tag is the most commonly used smart-card chip; it can be found in the London subway system’s Oyster card, Australia’s SmartRider, and the Boston subway’s ­Charlie Card. Security researcher Karsten Nohl, who recently got his PhD in computer science from the University of Virginia, and ­”Starbug,” a member of a Berlin hacker group called the Chaos Computer Club, hacked into a Mifare Classic’s hardware to gain insight into its cryptographic algorithms. After analyzing the chip, Nohl questioned its security in a series of presentations at recent conferences, including Black Hat in Las Vegas.

An Acetone Bath
Melting a smart card with acetone reveals an RFID chip within (visible in the lower right at the end of the video). The process takes about a half hour. After extracting the chip, a hacker can process it further to analyze its construction and programming.



RFID Chip
Nohl and Starbug used acetone to peel the plastic off the card’s millimeter-square chip. Once they isolated the chip, they embedded it in a block of plastic and sanded it down layer by layer to examine its construction. Nohl compares this to looking at the structure of a building floor by floor.

Layers
The chip has multiple layers that perform different functions, which the researchers had to tease apart in order to identify and understand its algorithms. Since the sanding technique didn’t work perfectly, it produced a series of partial images. Nohl and Starbug borrowed techniques from panoramic photography to create a clear composite image of each layer. They identified six in all: a cover layer, three interconnection layers, a logic layer, and a transistor layer.

Images Credit: Christopher Harting; Interactive Credit: Alastair Halliday

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Tagged: Computing, MIT, Black Hat, RFID, hacker, smart cards

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