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Features Archive

  • Data Smog: Surviving the Info Glut

    The ability to churn out ever greater volumes of information in a variety of formats has exceeded our ability to process it. Fortunately, firm action, both personal and political, can help clear the air.

  • Killing the Last Cancer Cell

    Recognizing that tumor cells lurking in the body after cancer treatment will cause a relapse of cancer, scientists are working to employ nature’s army-the immune system-to destroy remaining enemy outposts.

  • The Case of the Vanishing Frogs

    Are the world’s amphibians-vulnerable to eco-logical changes in water and on land-acting like canaries in a coal mine, warning us of environmental dangers below the threshold of human perception?

  • Missile Defense: The Sequel

    Today’s programs for defending against missile attacks are less ambitious than the Reagan-era Star Wars efforts. But the new systems are still too easily foiled, and their deployment would slow arms cuts.

  • Clicking onto Webzines

    Collecting, selecting, and refining the stories that go online, web-based magazines are transforming the internet experience. But these embryonic publications don’t yet fully exploit the new medium’s potential-and their financial viability is in question.

  • Dividing the Water

    Water may seem to be everywhere, but for a rising portion of the world’s population, there may soon be hardly a drop to drink -or to use for growing food, supporting industries and cities, and preserving life-giving ecosystems.

  • When the Sun Disappears and Dolphins Do Back Flips

    During total eclipses of the sun, at least one ancient culture performed mass human sacrifice to placate the gods. While our understanding of these celestial phenomena has grown, the author rediscovers the scientific curiosity they engender.

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