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Jennifer Chu Guest Contributor

  • Biofuel from Sewage

    Qteros forms a partnership to use sewage as a feedstock for making ethanol.

    1 comment

  • Protecting the Heart

    Surgical resident and bioengineer Bilal Shafi talks about heart failure and demonstrates how his new technology prevents it.

  • A Musical Score for Disease

    Gil Alterovitz, a research fellow at Harvard Medical School, translated populations of genes into musical notes. Each constellation (green) represents a key network of interrelated genes (blue). Each network is represented by a musical note. In healthy cells, the notes form music in harmony, indicating a healthy state. In cancer cells, the soundtrack veers out of harmony, signaling a transition from a healthy to a diseased state.

  • Cellulosic Ethanol on the Cheap

    Mascoma has announced several advances that may lead to a cheaper, more efficient process to turn biomass into ethanol.

    3 comments

  • A Better Biofuel Bug

    Scott Laughlin, CEO of Zymetis, discusses his company’s work to genetically modify bacteria that efficiently converts biomass to sugar.

  • A Better Biofuel Bug

    Zymetis is testing genetically modified bacteria that efficiently convert biomass into sugar.

    6 comments

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