Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

Apple’s iPad is powered by a chip the company designed specifically for the tablet computer: the one-gigahertz A4.

Keeping tabs on what a processor is doing (or not doing) is critical to extending battery life. This summer, Intel will release the next generation of its mobile Atom processor, which will use a third to half as much power as a conventional chip when it’s active and just a 50th as much power as when the device is idle.

In the short run, the drive to boost processor performance while saving energy will mean smart phones, netbooks, and tablets that work better and run longer on a single battery charge. And high-performance processors that require less energy may also change the way mobile devices are powered. The trickle of energy produced by a solar cell, or a piezoelectric device that converts the biomechanical energy of walking into electrical current, can’t do too much for today’s gadgets. But future mobile processors might get a significant boost from such energy sources.


0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Credits: Apple

Tagged: Computing

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me