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Light microscopes have had a basic limitation: they couldn’t image objects smaller than half the wavelength of light itself, leaving cellular machines like mitochondria a blur. But electron microscopes work only on dead cells. A new generation of light microscopes has broken the resolution barrier and could revolutionize biology by letting scientists glimpse the molecular workings of living cells. Click here for four of the most promising examples.

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Credit: John Sedat and Peter Carlton, University of California, San Francisco

Tagged: Biomedicine, Materials, imaging, cells, microscopes, electron microscopes, light microscopes

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