Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Screening people for bombs doesn’t do much good if a suicide bomber simply pulls the trigger at the checkpoint. A new technology could detect bombs by directing a low-power radar beam at people from a safe distance–as far as 100 meters away. Signal­-­processing software reveals concealed objects without producing an under-the-clothes image that could violate privacy. The technology, developed by SET of Arlington, VA, is assisted by video analysis software designed by Rama Chellappa, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland. Chellappa’s software tracks the movements of the person being screened, which helps keep the radar on target. The software could one day augment the technology even further by discerning subtle differences in the way people walk when they’re concealing heavy objects. Thomas Burns, CEO of SET, says the device, dubbed ­CounterBomber, could be ready for sale by this fall.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Credit: Set Corporation

Tagged: Communications, security, software, imaging, radar

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me