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CAREER: Bernard Steinberg was born in Brooklyn, NY. After a stint in the army, he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from MIT in electrical engineering in 1949. He worked in research and development at Philco in Philadelphia before cofounding General Atronics, a startup inventing company in radar and communications. Steinberg developed an adaptive signal-processing concept that improved the angular resolution of radar imagery.

In 1971 he earned a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania, where he became a professor of electrical engineering the same year. There he developed the radio camera and demonstrated two-dimensional radar imaging suitable for use in the military. His work led to improvements in ultrasound imaging for the medical industry as well. He also was involved in two other startups and wrote three books on high-resolution radar imaging, and he holds several patents in radar and electronics. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and has received an IEEE medal for his contributions to radar.

Steinberg’s wife Jacqueline died in 2003, and last year he remarried. He and his current wife, Barbara, have eight children and 12 grandchildren between them. Now in retirement, he studies the history of the early Israelites and teaches at a synagogue.

GIVING: Gift to establish graduate fellowships in electrical engineering and computer science, in memory of his wife Jacqueline.

QUOTE: “With a gift annuity, I was able to give to MIT and maintain cash flow, too. MIT was absolutely mag-nificent to me. I got more than an education; I learned a way of life. The gift annuity makes it possible to return the gift given to me through helping graduate students.”

For giving information, contact Judy Sager: 617-253-6463; jsager@mit.edu Or visit giving.mit.edu

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