Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

Imagine if weak or injured bones could be repaired simply by injecting a patient with a soft material that, once inside the body, would bond to existing bone at the molecular level, matching its hardness and strength. Researchers from Uppsala, Sweden-based Doxa have recently started human tests of just such a patching material. Today’s artificial-bone materials, usually made from calcium phosphate or polymers, either have serious side effects or are not strong enough to replace bone in certain areas, such as the spine. Doxa’s material, however, reacts to body fluids to form apatite, the body’s own ceramic, to make artificial bones just as strong as the original. If the material proves to be as good as inventor Leif Hermansson, a materials scientist at Uppsala University, claims, it could bring relief to millions of patients. In the United States alone, an estimated 10 million people suffer from osteoporosis-one of the first disease targets for which Doxa hopes to get the material approved, perhaps within the year.

 

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Biomedicine, Materials

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me
×

A Place of Inspiration

Understand the technologies that are changing business and driving the new global economy.

September 23-25, 2014
Register »