Select your localized edition:

Close ×

More Ways to Connect

Discover one of our 28 local entrepreneurial communities »

Be the first to know as we launch in new countries and markets around the globe.

Interested in bringing MIT Technology Review to your local market?

MIT Technology ReviewMIT Technology Review - logo

 

Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »

{ action.text }

Blinding glare is a common-and sometimes dangerous-problem for drivers, welders, commercial pilots, even for optical sensors in delicate equipment. Now a Penn State researcher has made liquid crystal materials that perform a kind of optical jujitsu-reacting to the light intensity by increasing their own opacity and blocking out the glare.

Electrical engineering professor I.C. Khoo says the most promising initial applications are protective goggles for anyone exposed to bright light or lasers, such as commercial pilots or welders. In addition, says Khoo, devices based on the materials could protect sensitive optical detectors used in instruments and satellites. He expects to build prototypes by this summer but declines to elaborate on what they will be used for. Research funding comes from the U.S. Army and the Naval Air Development Center.

0 comments about this story. Start the discussion »

Tagged: Communications

Reprints and Permissions | Send feedback to the editor

From the Archives

Close

Introducing MIT Technology Review Insider.

Already a Magazine subscriber?

You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account.

Activate Your Account

Become an Insider

It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research, and discoveries you crave.

Sign Up

Learn More

Find out why MIT Technology Review Insider is for you and explore your options.

Show Me